Amati Swedish Gunboat Build – Part 6

Member Clare Hess posts his latest update on building (and modifying) Amati’s Swedish Gunboat kit. This is a small, inexpensive kit that is short on instructions. Not ideal for beginners, but a nice kit for experienced ship modelers looking for a simple project.

Ship Modeler

Following our meeting in October, it was clear it was time to finish up the Swedish Gunboat build. We’re down to three active builders of this model from the five that started, which isn’t too bad. One of our  builders decided to finish his up as a gift for someone, and the other is a beginning ship modeler who is anxious to get to his next project. I’m also ready to have a project actually reach completion.

Rigging and Sails

I shaped the masts and the two lugsail yards some time back. I originally added a ball to the tops of the masts as shown on the kit plans, but replaced them with a thinner pole after looking at the photos of the museum model. The presence of the pole creates a shoulder at the top of the mast, that helps secure the shrouds and stays. While modifying the masts…

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Royal Danish Arsenal Museum, Copenhagen, Denmark

Royal Danish Arsenal Museum in Copenhagen now also houses the Royal Danish Maritime Museum.  The Sea Power maritime exhibit is on the 2nd floor of the building.  In addition to hundreds of models, there are uniforms, weapons and other artifacts.

I included a few photos of maritime interest, including boats on the canals, a tall ship and the Naval Chapel with a large ship model hanging in the middle.

[Editor’s Note: These photos were published by Jerry Bellows, a long time member of the Hyde Street Pier Model Shipwrights. He and his wife Fran are active volunteers at Hyde Street Pier and you might catch them on the pier in 1901 period costume on the second Saturdays from March through December.]

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Amati Swedish Gunboat Build – Part 4

Member Clare Hess shares the latest update on the building of a Swedish Gunboat from a kit by Amati Model of Italy.

Ship Modeler

Well, I did not end up finish this model for the IPMS show in San Jose in March. I decided to set it aside to let others in our build group catch-up, though I know that two of the members are at least as far along as I am. Anyway, I had work to do to for my display of Japanese boats, which ran from March 1st through the 31st.

Then, last weekend, we had a ship modelers’ get-together again at the Vallejo Naval and Historical Museum. It’s been the usual 3 months since our last gathering and it was good to see the fellow ship modelers and their projects again.

Only one other member of the Swedish Gunboat Project group brought his model, but he’s new to ship modeling and pressing ahead. I originally thought I would just wait for the other two members, who have been too tied…

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Model Gallery Updated

If you take a look in the Model Gallery, you will notice a number of additions. Check out the Dragoon and the Dorade, both by Paul Reck. But, there are a lot of other interesting models by the membership to inspire you.

All the images shown are of models built (or restored) by club members. I’m now working to get more photo contributions from the Hyde Street Pier Model Shipwrights membership.

All photos are from currently active members. Come join us and provide photos of your completed model and we’ll post them!

HSPMS Maritime Museum Warehouse Tour Follow-Up

On Thursday, March 2nd, members of the Hyde Street Pier Model Shipwrights got an opportunity to tour the facility where all the big stuff belonging to the San Francisco Maritime National Park are stored. The trip was set up and organized by Paul Reck and R. Karnell of the Park Service, who gave the tour.

This was a rare and unique opportunity to see what’s stored away in the enormous San Leandro warehouse. Some of it was there in preparation for use at Hyde Street Pier, like the C.A. Thayer’s and Balclutha’s spars. Other items were there waiting for restoration. Other’s still were just being stored there to protect them from deterioration, in the hopes that they will be displayed or worked on at some time in the future.

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AL’s Independence – Headrails and Rigging

Clare Hess updated the build log for his colonial schooner kit, which is based on a kit from Artesania Latina, but heavily modified with upgraded woods such as South American boxwood, pear and beech wood, and with aftermarket blocks, cannons and carriages.

Ship Modeler

Yes, I’m finally getting around to wrapping up the Colonial Schooner Independence. I’ve worked on it here and there, but hadn’t made any blog posts about in quite some time.

The last task that I was concerned about was to construct some headrails from scratch. Mostly, this is one of those tasks which is painful, because the brain says it’s painful. In actuality, it wasn’t that bad, but did take some mental work to wrap my head around where to even begin.

I found some examples that were more complex and finally found some that were simpler. I made sure that the images of those simpler ones became embedded in my brain. So, here’s what I came up with…

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I used castello boxwood for these, starting out by cutting them from thick sheet stock. Then, I cleaned them up and carved away the excess in such a way that it kind…

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A Change of Pace for Paul Reck

Ship modeler, lead volunteer and club Commodore Paul Reck said he got burned out on his current project, the schooner yacht Mayan. He’s been wrestling with trying to get a a nice weathered look to the model’s teak deck and needed a break.

He had acquired a neat little vintage plastic kit from the old Pyro Plastic Corporation and has been working on it lately. The whole model is only about 9-1/2″ long overall and around 1:170 scale according to one website (no scale is given on the box).

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Because the yards were molded as part of the sails, and he didn’t want to put sails on the model, he had to fashion some yardarms from maple.

The thin and “bendy” nature of the plastic masts, it took a very careful touch with the rigging to keep everything straight. But, it was difficult to keep lines from getting too slack.

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Paul also didn’t want to use the pre-molded plastic shrouds and ratlines, so rigging that part was an extra challenge, but he seemed to really enjoy the build.

Hopefully, we’ll see the model, in person, at the next meeting.