AMC’s New Series “The Terror” and the New Ship Model Kit HMS Terror

The release of new television series and the release of a wooden ship model kit aren’t things that often go together. So, seeing the new HMS Terror kit released by OcCre of Spain and the new series, The Terror, on American Movie Classics, was quite a surprise.

What’s special about the new kit from OcCre is that it’s based on the work of ship modeler Matthew Betts, who researched the subject for years in the construction of his scratch-build model of HMS Terror. Mister Betts describes the building of his own 1/48-scale model and his research in detail on his blog site, which you can find at: http://buildingterror.blogspot.ca

The 1/65-scale OcCre kit can be purchase from the Spanish company’s website for €99, at http://www.occre.com, or in the U.S., from Ages of Sail for $149 here: http://www.agesofsail.com/ecommerce/hms-terror-occre-oc12004.html

Having looked at the kit information, this appears to be a very good deal.

If you haven’t seen the series yet, it’s based on a novel by the same name, by author Dan Simmons. It follows the arctic explorations ships HMS Terror and HMS Erebus, both originally built as bomb vessels but modified for arctic operation, in their search for the fabled Northwest Passage. The crews face the elements, being trapped in the Arctic ice, disease, starvation, plus something much more sinister out on the ice that is killing them off one by one.

The series premiered on March 25, 2018 and the episodes can be seen on AMC and are available for purchase on iTunes. Here’s AMC’s own website on their new series: http://www.amc.com/shows/the-terror

In any case, we’ll be looking forward to seeing some builds of this kit (and more episodes of the series). Ω

Starting the Corel Flattie Project

The building of the Flattie kit by Corel began this past Saturday at the club’s model workshop aboard the Eureka. Members Paul Reck, Tom Shea and Clare Hess started the project. This kit is part of an effort by the club to recommend some ship model kits for new builders, and to serve as an intro kit for new club members. And, while the kit is officially a recommended kit, this is based mostly on cost, simplicity of the boat’s design, and simple rig.

Paul reviews the kit contents.

We purchased the kit from Ages of Sail, which is located across the bay, but we’re working on trying to get Kingspoke, the gift shop at the entrance to the pier, to carry the kit, so we can just send people there who are interested in starting the kit for themselves.

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February Meeting and a Recommended Model Kit

After dealing with some scheduling issues due to looming government shutdowns, the Hyde Street Pier Model Shipwrights managed a nice, normal meeting on February 17, the first meeting of the year. We had 8 members attending, which is pretty good for this group. We agreed that we need to bring in more ship modelers, as only about 3 attending members have been actively ship modeling in recent months.

Still, it was one of the most productive meetings we’ve had in some time. We also managed to replace the dehumidifier tubs in the big square-rigger model’s case. Being on the bay, we need to do this periodically to help keep these display models in good condition.

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Gunboat Philedelphia, 1776 – Model Progress Update by Paul Reck

HSPMS member Paul Reck shares some photos showing his progress on his 1776 Lake Champlain gunboat Philadelphia, which he is building from scratch in 1/24 scale, based on plans purchased from the Smithsonian.

Paul Reck showing his progress on the gunboat Philadelphia at the October meeting. Member Dan Canada at left.

The original boat was built on Lake Champlain as part of a small fleet of boats by Benedict Arnold in 1776. The project was a race to hold off British plans to move into the Hudson River valley. The boat was lost in the Battle of Valcour Island later in the year, but the loss of this and the other boats of the fleet was a strategic victory for the Americans, as it held off British plans until the end of the campaign year, when it became too late for the British to carry them out for another year.

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Amati Swedish Gunboat Build – Part 6

Member Clare Hess posts his latest update on building (and modifying) Amati’s Swedish Gunboat kit. This is a small, inexpensive kit that is short on instructions. Not ideal for beginners, but a nice kit for experienced ship modelers looking for a simple project.

Ship Modeler

Following our meeting in October, it was clear it was time to finish up the Swedish Gunboat build. We’re down to three active builders of this model from the five that started, which isn’t too bad. One of our  builders decided to finish his up as a gift for someone, and the other is a beginning ship modeler who is anxious to get to his next project. I’m also ready to have a project actually reach completion.

Rigging and Sails

I shaped the masts and the two lugsail yards some time back. I originally added a ball to the tops of the masts as shown on the kit plans, but replaced them with a thinner pole after looking at the photos of the museum model. The presence of the pole creates a shoulder at the top of the mast, that helps secure the shrouds and stays. While modifying the masts…

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HSPMS Newsletter and Meeting – February 2017

The next meeting of the Hyde Street Pier Model Shipwrights is coming up quickly, Saturday, February 18th aboard the ferryboat Eureka.

Naturally, the sunny weather we’ve been enjoying in the San Francisco Bay area is coming to an end, and the forecasts call for a couple days of rain. However, they show a break in the weather on the weekend. Let’s hope they’re correct!

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Models from the January meeting.

In the meantime, here’s the latest issue of the Hyde Street Pier Model Shipwrights Newsletter for February for your reading enjoyment.

https://hspms.files.wordpress.com/2014/08/hyde-street-2017-02-news.pdf

Note that we’ve got an outing coming up on March 2nd to the Maritime Museum off-site storage facility where we’ll see LOTS of stuff not normally accessible to the public. Now’s a good time to join the club!

Clare Hess Discovers HSPMS Parallel in Japan

For those who didn’t know, I’m in Japan doing some research on my own on Japanese watercraft.

Yesterday, I was in Tokyo and visited a museum where there was once a thriving fishing community. It’s all landfill and upscale apartments now, but they have a city museum that is a recreation of the old fishing community. They also keep some of the old boats there.

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So, what do I find when I walk downstairs amongst the old boats? A workshop set up in the middle, with three old guys at benches surrounded by small band saw, drill press, sanders, racks of clamps, sheets and blocks of wood, etc., and they’re making model boats!

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An Urayasu bekabune similar to the one I’m trying to build.

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Big language barrier here, more than is usual at a museum, but they’re all museum volunteers, and in the middle is the kind of gruff guy they pointed out as the “boss”. It was clear to me that this was kind of like the equivalent of the Hyde Street Pier Model Shipwrights.

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Now, these guys aren’t part of the Japanese ship model society called The Rope, that I’ve mentioned before. The boss is a former boat builder, and the others more or less appear to volunteer as his assistants. He actually has a full-sized boat building project going on there.

I wasn’t able to discern why they were building these models. They were actually kind of crude by ship modeller standards, but they were neat. They might be the kind of model you’d mass produce for museum shops, though there was no sign of anything like that. In one case, a larger model was clearly being set up for radio control.

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I finally ran across someone who actually worked there and he spoke some english, so we talked about the specific boats that the region was known for. The guy was kind of like their own Terry Dorman, our hard working volunteer coordinator with the Park Service, and he was dropping off some band saw blades that the builders needed.

I didn’t catch his job title, and I haven’t had a chance to translate the Japanese business card he gave me, but his name is Mr. Shimamura. Since I’m now modeling a bekabune, which is the boat type built and used in Urayasu, he showed me some details about them and gave me their museum pamphlets.

Unexpectedly, as we were heading towards the lobby, he left me for a minute and came back with a paper bag and motioned me to come outside. In front of the museum, he took one of the bekabune models that the volunteers built and handed it to me, saying “gift”. I was really taken aback, but grateful and thanked him very much.

In case you're wondering, it was 80˚+ with 87% humidity in Japan

In case you’re wondering, it was 80˚+ with 87% humidity in Japan

I had no idea how I’d take the 14″ long boat model back home with me, but I was expected I’d figure something out. As it turns out, I think this will be a great prop for my demo on Japanese boat modeling at the Nautical Research Guild conference next month. And, as it turns out, if I’m really careful, I can pack it quite comfortably in my luggage.

I could easily have spent another hour or two at the museum, but it was late in the day, and having received the gift from Mr. Shimamura, it seemed like a perfect end to the visit. I will definitely be coming back here again on another trip

– Clare Hess