Taking Another Look: Navio Rayo Gun Section Kit

This is a pretty nice looking kit. Ideal for beginning ship modelers, and anyone who wants something large scale to detail. The model takes up little space, has planking without the complicated curved surfaces to deal with, nicely detailed cannons and carriages, nice details like the gunnery tools, and no serious rigging to have to deal with except for gun tackles. I suspect it should also be a pretty quick build too. Would love to see someone in the club build it – would look nice in our display case, wouldn’t it?

Ages of Sail

It was about 3-1/2 years ago that Ages of Sail first introduced this new line of Spanish wooden model kits to North America. Among the first batch of kits was an often overlooked wood model kit of a section of the 18th-century Spanish warship Rayo. The Rayo was an 80-gun ship-of-the-line built in 1746.  The ship was rebuilt in Cartagena in 1803, transforming her into a three-decked ship of 100 guns.


If you’re interested in getting the kit, you’ll find it on our website here: https://www.agesofsail.com/ecommerce/navio-rayo-s.xviii-puesto-de-combate,-wooden-kit-by-disar,-20148.html


Soon after, the Rayo joined the coalition of French and Spanish ships sailing out of Cadiz on 18 October, 1805. Three days later the combine French and Spanish fleet encountered the British fleet under Admiral Lord Nelson off Cape Trafalgar on the southwest coast of Spain.

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Building the Kanrin Maru – Japan’s First Screw Steamer – Part 3

Ship Modeler and HSPMS member, Clare Hess, discusses one of the interesting features of the Kanrin Maru. This ship was Japan’s first screw-steamer. It was built by the Dutch for the Japanese Shogun and delivered in 1857. In 1860, the Kanrin Maru, arrived in San Francisco as part of the mission of the first Japanese embassy to the United States.

Clare’s build is based on a modified 1/75-scale Woody Joe kit.

Ship Modeler

Notice anything special about that photo of the fully planked hull in my last post? If you look closely, you may notice that the center section of some of the bulkheads are missing. If you’ve followed any of my wooden ship model building, you’d probably be aware that I can’t leave kits well enough alone. One of the things I’ve always liked to do is to add a hint of an interior. Nothing blatant, just a hint to create something of an image in the observer’s imagination.

Arrows showing where bulkhead sections were removed

I’ve discovered that I don’t like building full interiors and I don’t like lighting a model’s interior. That’s too blatant and too showy for me. I want the observer to look at the model and discover an open door and to catch a glimpse of more detail without actually being able to see beyond it.

You’ll…

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